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Robert Nance's Albums > Antarctica Expedition Favorites
My Favorites out of the much larger collections in parts I, II, III
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The eastern part of the small city of Ushuaia, Argentina on a fairly clear day. This city is where we embarked on the expedition.


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Looking behind us toward some of the mountains near Ushuaia, and the pilot boat for the port.


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The rocks we encountered in Whaler's Bay, Deception Island, are the result of lava becoming rock when it runs into thick ice.


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A Chinstrap Penguin, the first penguin I encountered in the wild. They are a little bigger than the Gentoo Penguins, who also were scattered around Whaler's Bay.


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A Gentoo Pengin, resting.


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The small cemetery at Whaler's Bay


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Our ship, MS The World, in Whaler's Bay.


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Cuverville Island


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Weddell Seal, near Cuverville Island


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Leopard Seal, near Cuverville Island


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Gentoo Penguin on the penguin highway at Neko Harbor


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Paradise Bay, named for it's relatively friendly climate (a low bar)


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Approaching Lemaire Channel from the north, late afternoon


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The south end of Lemaire Channel, looking north


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The Penola Strait had sufficient ice, that we couldn't reach the Antarctic Circle, as The World had in previous years


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The view from the other side of this Lemaire Channel landmark is as spectacular as the better known side.


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Approaching Port Lockroy


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The building containing the post office, store, and museum at Port Lockroy


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Approaching "Iceberg Alley", Antarctic Sound


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From our Kayak, some Adelie penguins at Brown Bluff (just off of Antarctic Sound)


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Penguins porpoising


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North edge of the Weddell Sea


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Approaching Elephant Island


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That thin peninsula on the right is Cape Valentine, where Shackleton's mens first reached land after a couple years on the ice. They soon realized they shouldn't/couldn't stay there and moved a bit further west to Port Wild.


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Port Wild, where Shackleton's men awaited rescue


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The peculiar monument at port wild, not to Shackleton or any of his crew, but to the captain of the ship that Shackleton got to rescue them.


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The former whaling station of Grytviken, South Georgia Island. Now a historical site complete with museum and post office. It is where we first encountered King Penguins


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Elephant seals blocking the trail to Shackleton's gravesite


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Grytviken from a distance


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St. Andrews Bay, South Georgia Island


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Sometime King Penguins seem to do a dominance dance, involving bumping of their chests and extending their necks to be as tall as possible


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Looking back at St. Andrews Bay as we left


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Looking back at St. Andrews Bay as we left


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Albatross we saw as we entered Drygalski Fjord (the southern end of South Georgia Island)


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Gold Harbour, South Georgia Island. Lots of snow and rough surf meant we could only see what we could see from a zodiac


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Gold Harbour, South Georgia Island. The snow finally lifted somewhat just as we were leaving, revealing some of the scenery we had been missing


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Cooper Bay, South Georgia Island (actually an island a bit off to the south east of South Georgia Island proper). Here we first encountered Macaroni Penguins (named for the decorative feathers on their heads), along with a very large number of seals and Gentoo Penguins. Our naturalist had never seen anywhere near as many seal pups there as on this visit.


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Fortuna Bay, South Georgia Island. Another very snowy morning in South Georgia's warmest time of the year


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The main King Penguin nesting area at Fortuna Bay had 50,000 pairs - stunning to see and hear so many up close.


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Stromness, South Georgia Island. This valley is just to the other side of the ridge from Fortuna Bay, and that crossing was the last leg of Shackleton's rescue adventure - he reached "civilization" here at Stromness


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Waterfall famous as the last hurdle of Shackleton's crossing of South Georgia Island - when he was here it was covered in ice and snow, making their climb down near it tricky.


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Shag Rocks - the tiny islands between South Georgia Island and The Falklands, named for the Blue-eyed Shags covering them


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Giant Petrel near Shag Rocks.


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Albatross near Shag Rocks


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Right Whale near Shag Rocks. Right Whales are now believed to be recovering nicely from their near-extinction from over-hunting a century ago.


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Stanley, Falkland Islands


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West Point, Falkland Islands. Home of a large Albatross colony. The albatrosses shared it with Rock Hopper penguins


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Devil's nose - formation on the south side of West Point


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View of Devil's nose and the nesting area from the other side


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Steeple Jason Island, Falkland Islands. Largest albatross colony in the world, but we didn't get very close as we were just navigating by it on our way back to Argentina.


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